Behaviour Management

Occasionally, student co-operation in the classroom declines and disruptive behaviour increases. As a result, a more decisive approach against the actions of the disruptive students is needed in order to protect the rights of those who show a desire to learn. The following procedures have evolved over the years and it is considered important that parents be kept regularly informed of their own children’s disruptive behaviour where relevant.

The following procedures are applied school-wide:

Year 9 Students

  • If a student disrupts the teacher, the student will be spoken to immediately.
  • The second time that student disrupts the class, the student will again be spoken to and warned that a third interruption will result in their removal from class.
  • On the third occasion, the offending student will be sent from their class to the office with work to complete. The office will send the student on to a withdrawal room with a withdrawal form to fill out. This withdrawal form will include an appointment time to meet the teacher who removed them. This meeting is for pastoral purposes and is for trying to resolve the problem through discussion rather than using punitive measures.
  • Having met, the teacher and student reach an understanding and the student signs the withdrawal form agreeing to return to the class and to follow the classroom procedures next time. At the same time, a note will be sent to the parent of the child informing them of this situation.

This is the outline of one complete cycle. Year Nine students will be permitted five such cycles (fifteen classroom interruptions) without punitive action being taken against them.

  • At the completion of the fifth cycle, the Dean will meet with the student and a caregiver. The student will be placed on daily report and be instructed to meet with the guidance counsellor. At this stage, the child has disrupted classes on at least fifteen occasions and the parents will have received five notes.
  • If the report is not satisfactory, the student will be withdrawn from class for a whole day and the caregivers will be asked to come in and meet with the Dean and the AP/DP. From this point on, the student will be transferred to the Green form system used with years 10 to 13.
  • All year 9 students will move on to the Green form system at the start of term three.

Year 10 – Year 13 Students

Having been given the opportunity to resolve classroom disruptions during the previous year, without punitive action being taken against them in the early stages, students will now be clear on teacher expectations and so a much less tolerant system operates during these years.

  • If a student disrupts the teacher, the student will be spoken to immediately.
  • The second time that student disrupts the class; the student will again be spoken to and warned that a third interruption will result in their removal from class.
  • On the third occasion, the offending student will be sent with a withdrawal form from their class to the school office with work to complete. This withdrawal form will include an appointment time for a lunchtime detention during the following school day. Such a detention will over-ride any other lunchtime arrangements or activities.
  • A letter will be sent to the parents of the student on the day he or she is removed from class.

This process will continue until the fifth lunchtime detention has been completed. This means that the student has interrupted lessons on at least fifteen occasions. The student will meet with either the AP or the DP and will be given a warning that a formal one hour after-school detention for continual disobedience will be awarded if they are removed from class on a sixth occasion. Counselling may follow.

Reward System

While the previous notes appear somewhat draconian in nature, the majority of students in our school barely involve themselves with these systems. In recognition of the large amount of good work in the school, we operate our Good Stuff Awards and our Gold Award system, which include tangible rewards.

Gold Awards

A Gold Award is presented by a teacher to a student who performs Above their Normal Level of Performance. In addition, it is not uncommon for teachers to recognise the consistent performance of some of their students in this way. A gold award may also be given for one-off actions worthy of praise. However, it is not appropriate to issue a gold award to a normally disruptive pupil simply because on one day he/she behaves in a way similar to the behaviour exhibited by other students all the time. Recipients of Gold Awards have their names put into a lucky draw held each Friday. The winner receives a $5.00 canteen credit to spend how they wish.

When a student has 5 gold awards, the student takes them to their form teacher who checks on Kamar that the awards are genuine, countersigns on the back of each card and enters a gold merit certificate on Kamar. This certificate entitles the student to have a mufti day with up to 4 nominated friends. Alternatively, a student may retain the Gold Merit certificate. With two certificates the student may cash them in at the office for a single movie pass.

Good Stuff Awards

At the end of each term, teachers are asked to nominate at least one but no more than five students from each of their classes to receive a Good Stuff award. The students nominated are those who have applied themselves consistently throughout the term showing commitment, consideration and cooperation.

Special Character ‘Good Stuff’ awards are also available to be issued by each teacher for each of their classes (maximum three per class). These Special Character Good Stuff awards are for Consideration, Co-operation or Commitment. A teacher may choose not to award them.

Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L)

Students are given tickets and a draw is held each week. The winner receives a $5.00 canteen credit to spend how they wish.

Formal Detention System

There are a number of causes for the issuing of formal detentions which are held after school on Wednesdays between 3:15 pm and 4:15 pm

If a student receives five formal one hour detentions during one school term, then that student may be stood down from school for up to three days for continual disobedience. No student is permitted, by law, to be stood down for more than ten days in any one school year, nor for more than five days in any one term. This means that if any student continues to be a harmful element in the school after being stood down for the maximum period, then the Principal has no choice but to suspend that student from school.

Bullying

In cases of serious and/or persistent bullying physical or verbal our school operates a 16 week anti-bullying programme for offenders. Bullying of any form is not accepted at our school.